Pornography

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Many young people are curious about sex, and use porn, as one of several sources, to find information on sexual activities. According to the Children and Media-study from 2020, 70% of boys and 25% of girls between the ages 13 and 18 have watched porn. The boys especially look up porn regularly, some from they are 10 years old. Most adolescents are able to separate pornography from reality, but others find it difficult. Younger children may find pornography very frightening. Looking up porn is a normal part of sexual development, but can at the same time affect attitude and sexual behaviour, sometimes concerningly so (Pratt, 2015, Save the Children 2020).

Pornography is easily accessible, and some children and young people are in danger of developing a form of addiction to porn which can affect normal sexual development, developing a tolerance for “hardcore porn” which leads to needing more and more extreme stimuli to achieve sexual arousal. A frequently occurring aspect of addiction is a reduced ability to regulate emotions and mentalize. Watching violent pornography seems to increase the risk of sexual aggression compared to watching non-violent pornography.

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Lecturer

Morten Lundgren is a specialist in clinical pedagogy. He works as a senior advisor in Bufetat. In addition, he is a university lector at the Regional center of knowledge for children and young people – mental health and child welfare (RKBU, Mid-Norway). Lundgren has, for many years, worked as a practitioner at BUP where he was responsible for assessing children and young people’s aggressive and violent behaviour as well as problematic and harmful sexual behaviour. He is in the Resource team for problematic or harmful sexual behaviour (REBESSA).